Index of Webinars

  • Helping Families Plan for College Success
  • Engaging ELLs with Academic Language and Content: A Professional Development Approach
  • Detracking within Racially Diverse Schools: Strategies and Benefits
  • Summer Reading, Summer Not: Preventing Summer Reading Loss
  • An Integrated School-Level Approach to Dropout Prevention

 
Helping Families Plan for College Success
 
Date
March 22, 2011
 
About 

This 20-minute web-based presentation by the Mid-Atlantic Equity Center (MAEC) is called a MAEC Capsule.  The purpose of the MAEC Capsule is to introduce resources from MAEC in a timely, convenient manner.  Preparing a child for college is a complex process, and to navigate that process, families often need information and support. This webinar discusses how educators and community groups can help families navigate the entire college preparation process.

View the webinar at: ceee.gwu.na4.acrobat.com/p43328032/


 
Engaging ELLs with Academic Language and Content: A Professional Development Approach
 
DATE
April 27, 2010
Presenters: Krisghghtina Anstrom, Ed.D. and Patricia DiCerbo, Ed.D., The George Washington University Center for Equity and Excellence in Education (GW-CEEE)
 
View this webinar: http://ceee.gwu.na4.acrobat.com/p65217177/
Download the Presentation: MAEC Webinar on ELL.pdf
Information about the Linking Academic Language to Academic Standards (LALAS) Project: http://lalas.ceee.gwu.edu/
 
WEBINAR DESCRIPTION
For English language learners (ELLs) to succeed in the core content areas, they need a strong grasp of academic language. In this webinar Kristina Anstrom and Patricia DiCerbo present a collaborative approach to professional development that can help educators (1) understand the language demands of content areas, and (2) support ELLs in developing their academic language skills. They discuss how to identify the academic language that students need to perform well in core subjects and illustrate how to address academic language through instruction.
 
Topics discussed
·         How to identify academic language that may be difficult for ELLs
·         Why teaching academic language is essential for improving ELL achievement
·         How schools and districts can use the language analysis team approach to professional learning
Who benefits from this Webinar
·         Teachers, administrators, counselors, and technical assistance providers seeking information on how to increase the achievement of ELLs in the core content areas
·         Professional development coordinators seeking to strengthen the capabilities of teachers working with ELLs
  

 
     Detracking within Racially Diverse Schools: Strategies and Benefits

     DATE
April 1, 2010
Presenter: Carol Burris, Ed.D, Principal of South Side High School in Rockville Centre School District

View this webinar: http://ceee.gwu.na4.acrobat.com/p56597017/
Download Presentation: http://maec.ceee.gwu.edu/sites/default/files/Detracking Presentation.pdf
 
WEBINAR DESCRIPTION
Tracking students by ability is deeply engrained in the way schools organize students for instruction. Yet research suggests that tracking perpetuates, rather than eliminates, low achievement and the achievement gap. In this webinar Carol Burris describes the educational harm caused by tracking and discusses why it persists.  She presents strategies that schools and districts, educators and administrators can use to eliminate tracking and low-track classes, maintain a de-tracked school, and close the achievement gap. Dr. Burris draws on her own experiences as a principal in a diverse suburban school district to present strategies for dismantling tracking and developing a high quality curriculum for all students.
 
Topics discussed
·         The effects of low-track classes on achievement and school climate.
·         The leadership, political, and instructional components of a detracking strategy. 
·         The benefits of giving all students access to a rigorous curriculum.
Who benefits from this Webinar
·         Teachers, administrators, counselors, and technical assistance providers seeking information on how to detrack the curriculum.
·         Anyone looking for guidance from a practitioner with hands-on experience navigating the complexities of detracking.
 
PRESENTER
Carol Burris, Ed.D., is the Principal of South Side High School in Rockville Centre, NY, a racially and socio-economically diverse suburban school district. She is co-author with Delia T. Garrity of Detracking for Equity and Excellence (2008), which examines the myths associated with tracking and addresses how to dismantle tracking and incorporate a challenging curriculum for all courses. Dr. Burris has extensive experience implementing detracking during her tenure as a high school principal and has conducted research on the positive effects on student achievement of detracking and heterogeneously grouped classes. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

     Summer Reading, Summer Not: Preventing Summer Reading Loss

     DATE
March 25, 2010
Presenter: James S. Kim, Harvard Graduate School of Education

View this webinar: http://ceee.gwu.na4.acrobat.com/p78922013/
Download Presentation: Summer Learning, Summer Not.ppt
Download the Paper: Summer Reading, Summer Not.pdf
 
WEBINAR DESCRIPTION
Research indicates that minority and low-income children fall behind in reading during summer vacation, thus contributing to widening the achievement gap. In this webinar, James S. Kim discusses how schools can implement a voluntary summer reading program (Project READS) designed to improve reading achievement by preventing summer reading loss. He describes the components of the model and provides a checklist of things schools and districts can do to implement the model. Project READS is an empirically validated model that combines teacher instruction on oral reading fluency and comprehension instruction, with parental support during the summer.
 
Topics discussed
·     How summer learning loss contributes to the achievement gap.
·     How Project READS prevents summer learning loss.
·     How schools and districts can implement a summer reading program.
Who benefits from this Webinar
·     Teachers, administrators, counselors, and technical assistance providers seeking information on how to improve reading achievement.
·    District and school administrators seeking an easy to implement, empirically validated model for preventing summer reading loss.
 
PRESENTER
James S. Kim, assistant professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is a former history teacher who taught in an ethnically diverse middle school in Virginia. He launched Project READS in 2005 to help schools and districts improve reading achievement, motivation, and attitudes of students towards reading. He has conducted experimental studies on Project READS to determine whether a voluntary summer reading intervention can improve reading achievement, particularly for minority and low-income students.

 


 


An Integrated School-Level Approach to Dropout Prevention

Description:

Beyond the Indicators provides an integrated framework that schools and districts can use to build a foundation to prevent students from dropping out.  Based on a tiered public health model, this framework provides universal and schoolwide practices designed to produce high attendance, positive behavior, and successful academic achievement for the majority of students.  It includes implementing early warning systems that identify students at risk of dropping out, and tiered interventions to insure that struggling students stay on track to graduate. 

The webinar (June 15, 2009) includes background information on developing an indicator system to identify students at-risk of dropping out, but goes beyond identification to offer a multi-tiered approach to keeping students in schools.

This report (August 2009) summarizes the research on why students drop out of school, explains the research implications for how to create an integrated dropout prevention strategy, and highlights an innovative pilot project that yielded results in a matter of months—a how-to example that works.

Authors:


Martha Abele Mac Iver, research scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Everyone Graduates Center, is a political scientist who studies the effectiveness of school and district educational interventions designed to improve student achievement. She is currently leading a research initiative in Colorado aimed at curbing the dropout rate.

Douglas Mac Iver, principal research scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Everyone Graduates Center, studies how to change classrooms, schools, and districts in ways that make them more effective in promoting student learning and engagement. He is part of a research and development team that created the Talent Development Middle Grades Model, a whole-school reform model.